Monday, September 18, 2017

US companies in the business economies of the EU–and the taxation of their profits

Data from Eurostat clearly shows the oversized presence of US companies in Ireland.  The table below gives the contribution of US companies to the business economies of the EU15 in 2014 for profits, pay, employees and investment.  The business economy is NACE B to N excluding K so it reflects the economy excluding the financial sector, sectors dominated by the public sector such as health and education, and the arts. 

Contribution of US companies to EU15 2014 2

For all the categories shown the largest contribution of US companies is in Ireland.  US companies employ 8.3 per cent of all people employed in the business economy (it is c.5 per cent of total employment) and because they pay rates are higher US companies contribute more the 13 per cent of employee remuneration.  Around one-tenth of investment in tangible goods (excluding aircraft) in Ireland is undertaken by US-owned companies.  In all of these measures the UK is next while the figures for Ireland are between three and four times greater than the mean across the EU15.

The stand-out figure is clearly for Gross Operating Surplus with US companies responsible for more than half of the Gross Operating Surplus generated in Ireland.  The next largest is Luxembourg though the relative contribution is three and a half times smaller while the mean across the EU15 is 14 times smaller than that recorded in Ireland.

We would probably prefer Net Operating Surplus (which is akin to earnings before tax and interest) but GOS gives a good approximation of the contribution of US companies to the corporate tax base in each country.  If for some reason Ireland ended up with a contribution of US companies to gross operating surplus close to the EU mean it would represent a loss of close to half the corporate tax base.

Relative to other EU countries Ireland benefits disproportionately from US companies under the headings of staff, pay and capital investment but the largest difference is for profits.  Ireland’s corporate tax revenues are generated by US companies to an extent that no other EU country comes anywhere near.

The following table gives the numbers behind the contributions of US companies in Ireland.  The total for the business economy is given as well as a breakdown by the main sectors: manufacturing, wholesale and retail, information and communication and the rest.  Remember that the financial sector is not included in any of the data used here.

Contribution of US companies to business economy in Ireland 2014

The key figures are €6.5 billion of personnel costs for 103,000 staff and €2.5 billion of investment in tangible goods.  From the €39 billion of gross operating surplus Ireland probably collected in the region of €2 billion in Corporation Tax while something around €4 billion of the total purchases of goods and services would have been made from Irish suppliers.  This gives a total of €15 billion or so.

We can see how this is broken down by the main contributing sectors in the subsequent columns.  The largest sector is manufacturing with about half of the staff, pay bill and profit totals.  Capital investment in Ireland by US manufacturing companies seemed surprisingly low in 2014.  For the years 2008 to 2012, US manufacturing companies undertook an average of over €1 billion of capital investment in Ireland.  The 2014 figure was just one-twelfth of that though capital investment by ICT companies meant the total of €2.5 billion was in and around the annual average since 2008.

The final thing we can look at is the distribution of these contributions from US companies across the EU.  In can be seen that in terms of absolute size across the EU, US companies have their largest footprint in the UK, well for the time being anyway.  Around 30 per cent of US companies profits, staff, pay and investment in the EU are in the UK.

Distribution of contribution of US companies in the EU

The stand-out figure for Ireland is again for profit.  Just over one-fifth of the gross operating surplus generated by US companies in the EU in 2014 arose in Ireland.  Current rules for allocating taxing rights means that Ireland has approximately one-fifth of the taxable income of US companies in the EU in its tax base.

Alternative proposals to allocate taxing rights are contained in the Commission’s CCCTB proposal.  This would allocate taxing rights on the basis of number of employees, pay bill, tangible capital goods and sales.  Obviously, the allocation will be done by individual company but we can see that in aggregate Ireland has about three percent of the staff measures to be included and maybe around double that for the tangible investment component (or at least for new investment in tangible capital goods in 2014).

We don’t know where these companies sell the goods and services that make up the turnover column but we can get a rough approximation of the size of national markets using ‘actual individual consumption’ from national accounts statistics.  Ireland is about one per cent of the EU market.

Again, the aggregates here don’t provide the granular detail that would go into the calculation at the level of the individual firm but if taxing rights were to be allocated on the basis of employees, pay bills, capital goods and sales, Ireland’s tax base from US companies could fall from the current level of around 20 per cent of profits generated by US companies in the EU using the arm’s length principle to something roughly one-sixth or one-seventh of that under formulary apportionment.  Again this would represent a loss of around half the existing Corporation Tax base.

Who would favour this approach?  Well, just look at France,  Italy and to a lesser extent Spain, in the above table.  France is nearly 16 per cent of the EU market and has around 10 per cent of the employment and capital investment of US companies in the EU.  How does France fare on taxing rights?  Much lower.  Only 3.4 per cent of the gross operating surplus generated by US companies in the EU in 2014 arose in France.  A similar outcome can be seen for Italy with shares of employees, pay bill, capital goods and market size that exceed its current share of the tax base.  Winners and losers.

1 comment:

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